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Take the thinking caps off

by Jordan Ficklin

There have been some great guesses about the problem watch from last week’s post. The key was to really look at the picture. Matthew and Andrew noticed the key fact. The dial (and movement) are rotated in the case. This is easily observable at the cyclops. You can see that the date sits very high in the magnifier, where it should be centered. In the pictures below you will see that the two pieces of the broken stem do not line up.

The movement has rotated in the case. There is really no way the stem would ever have been able to be in this watch with the movement rotated this badly. I don’t know what caused the movement to rotate, perhaps a violent golf swing? But when the movement rotated (from whatever shock) the stem sheared right off.

Thank you all for your guesses. I appreciate your participation on the blog.

6 Comments

  1. Posted December 16, 2008 at 8:56 am | Permalink

    Thanks.

    I really enjoy the blog as I’ve only just taken the level 1 course over at timezone. Hopefully you’ll have more challenges posted soon.

    -Mathew

  2. Posted December 16, 2008 at 9:10 am | Permalink

    Hey J.Peter

    Fellow LWT Graduate here, I was one year ahead of you to graduate in 2005. Looking at that stem it appears to be rusted in the picture. Never good!

    Anyways, Just wanted to say hi.

  3. Posted December 16, 2008 at 6:02 pm | Permalink

    Hi

    I am really interested in repairing watches, and was hoping you could advise me how you would go about it. I live in the UK, so I can’t attend any courses in the US. If you have any advice, I would be all ears for you. Thanks.

  4. bannes Lee
    Posted December 17, 2008 at 7:49 am | Permalink

    Hi,I’m was a junior watch polisher.if i want to take the entry test what i need to do?like prepairation.and it’s that difficult?
    i really interested in watch making can you give me some adivise.Thank you very much

  5. Wes
    Posted January 21, 2009 at 5:10 pm | Permalink

    that being a Rolex is the purplish Gear one that is Teflon coated?

  6. J.Peter
    Posted January 22, 2009 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

    Wes, The red gears pictured are the reversing wheels. Their red color is unique to Rolex and I have never seen them in any other watch. I have however seen Chinese counterfeits with red stickers on reversing wheels. To the best of my knowledge they are often erroneously referred to as being Teflon coated. They are, I believe, made from anodized Aluminum (also a non-stick substance) like is used on Calphalon cookware.

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